12.17.12

American Muslims Mourn Rampage Victims

In spirit, interfaith work should not be limited to national boundaries.  The recent tragedy in the north eastern state of Connecticut was a crime against all of humanity. Whenever the young or the innocent are slaughtered, it should grieve the world, not just one nation.

In ISNA’s special announcement, Imam Magid, President of the Islamic Society of North America, highlighted the Interfaith Vigil as an important aspect:

On Sunday, the Muslim community of the Al Hedaya Islamic Center in Newtown, in Connecticut and other area mosques, joined fellow Americans in an Interfaith Vigil to share the grieving for those who died and praying for them and their families.

Interfaith gatherings after tragedies are important because it reminds the people that no matter what nationality we are, caring and loving for each other is at the core of every religious doctrine.

On September 15, 1963, a bomb took the life of four little girls in Birmingham, Alabama, and though the attack was racially motivated, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King had the following to say:

“We must be concerned not merely about who murdered them, but about the system, the way of life, the philosophy which produced the murderers.” - Eulogy for the Martyred Children

True interfaith work does not stop after the mourning and praying. The mourning and praying are merely the beginning to the healing of the shattered hearts. Being critical of the “system, the way of life, the philosophy” that is allowing for and producing these murderers is vitally important if we are to realize a true healing.

I rather know the names of the 12 girls, eight boys, and six adult women who were wrongly murdered:

Charlotte Bacon, 2/22/06, female
Daniel Barden, 9/25/05, male
Rachel Davino, 7/17/83, female.
Olivia Engel, 7/18/06, female
Josephine Gay, 12/11/05, female
Ana M. Marquez-Greene, 04/04/06, female
Dylan Hockley, 3/8/06, male
Dawn Hochsprung, 06/28/65, female
Madeleine F. Hsu, 7/10/06, female
Catherine V. Hubbard, 6/08/06, female
Chase Kowalski, 10/31/05, male
Jesse Lewis, 6/30/06, male
James Mattioli , 3/22/06, male
Grace McDonnell, 12/04/05, female
Anne Marie Murphy, 07/25/60, female
Emilie Parker, 5/12/06, female
Jack Pinto, 5/06/06, male
Noah Pozner, 11/20/06, male
Caroline Previdi, 9/07/06, female
Jessica Rekos, 5/10/06, female
Avielle Richman, 10/17/06, female
Lauren Rousseau, 6/1982, female (full date of birth not specified)
Mary Sherlach, 2/11/56, female
Victoria Soto, 11/04/85, female
Benjamin Wheeler, 9/12/06, male
Allison N. Wyatt, 7/03/06, female

American Muslims Mourn Rampage Victims

OnIslam & News Agencies

 

CAIRO – Muslims joined fellow Americans Sunday, December 16, in mourning 20 children slaughtered by a gunman who forced his way into their school in the northeastern state of Connecticut.

 

“The Muslim Community at the Al Hedaya Islamic Center in Newtown CT and at other area Masajid in Danbury CT (Danbury Masjid & Baitul Mukarram) share in the grief of the families of the children in today’s tragedy,” the center said in a statement on its website.

 

“This is an especially painful time for all of us across the Greater Danbury Region.”

 

At least 26 people, including 20 children aged 5 to 10 years old, were killed when a heavily-armed gunman stormed into their school in Newtown, Connecticut, on Friday.

 

The gunman killed his mother at home and then went to the school, killing 20 students at a classroom, before shooting five other adults and killing himself.

 

“I came out to show my support and remember those who were lost to family members,” Kisha Slater, who attended a vigil at the Toledo Children’s Memorial, toldToledo Blade.

 

“Pain is everywhere. It’s not just in one location. It could happen in our city. I know what the parents are feeling,” said Slater, who was joined at the vigil by her daughter, grandson and two nieces.

 

Standing in silence, the mourners flickered candles in their hands in remembrance of the victims.

 

One large brown teddy bear wore a sign, the printed letters rain-streaked: “Praying for the children in Connecticut. God bless.”

 

“This is hard, but I had to be here. I had to,” said Nancy Snyder, who showed up to offer sympathy for families of the victims.

 

“To know somebody you don’t even know cares, it helps. That’s what I’m doing here — hoping it sends comfort and support.”

 

US President Barack Obama was set to attend a vigil in Newtown on Sunday to mourn victims of the school tragedy.

 

Disbelief

 

Many American were still in a state of shock two days after the massacre.

 

“I’m still in shock,” Greg Sadowski, 45, a registered nurse at St. John’s Riverside Hospital in Yonkers, who lives in Newtown and has a son who attends Sandy Hook Elementary, told The Journal News.

 

“This is unimaginable. I know many of these kids that lost their lives.”

 

Police on Sunday released the names and age of those killed in the school massacre. They included 16 six-year-olds and four seven-year-olds.

 

Police said they had assembled “some very good evidence” on the killer’s motives but revealed little.

 

The killer, Adam Lanza, had struggled at times to fit into the community and his mother Nancy pulled him out of school for several years, to home-school him.

 

The killer’s mother legally owned a Sig Sauer and a Glock, both handguns commonly used by police, and the military-style Bushmaster long gun, according to law enforcement officials.

 

His father, Peter Lanza, issued a statement saying the family was in a “state of disbelief.”

 

“No words can truly express how heartbroken we are,” he said in a statement vowing to continue cooperating with law enforcement.

 

“We, too, are asking why,” he said. “Like so many of you, we are saddened and struggling to make sense of what has transpired.”

 

The United States has experienced a number of mass shooting rampages this year, most recently in Oregon, where a gunman opened fire at a shopping mall on Tuesday, killing two people and then himself.

 

The deadliest came in July at a midnight screening of a Batman film in Colorado that killed 12 people and wounded 58.

 

In 2007, 32 people were killed at Virginia Tech university in the deadliest act of criminal gun violence in US history.